Why ground cherries are a great addition to the backyard garden

Ground cherries are a great addition the backyard garden. Not only are these tomatillo relatives a heavy producer but they also require little maintenance. | www.pickytoplenty.com

Ground cherries are a great addition the backyard garden. Not only are these tomatillo relatives a heavy producer but they also require little maintenance. | www.pickytoplenty.com

Would you look at those beauties? I grew those little lanterns from seed that I purchased from Tree and Twig Heirloom Vegetable Farm in Wellandport. I had never heard of these relative to the tomatillo before stumbling upon them on Linda Crago’s website. I was instantly intrigued, especially by the fact that they are extremely productive.

According to the seed packet, ground cherries have been around since the early 19th Century. The variety I am growing, one of the most popular, is Aunt Molly’s variety. The earliest recording of this fruit was 1837 in Pennsylvania. This Polish variety is prized for its clean flavour.

Aunt Molly's Ground Cherries date back to the early 19th Century. They are a great addition to any backyard garden. | www.pickytoplenty.com

Aunt Molly’s Ground Cherries are a great addition to any backyard garden. | www.pickytoplenty.com

The flavour is quite unique. It tastes like a pineapple crossed with a grape. It is sweet with a hint of citrus. It is delicious.

Plants can grow to 18 inches tall and 24 inches wide, so they will need quite a bit of space in your garden. I grew mine in a square, raised bed garden that also include caped gooseberries, raspberries and blueberries (both of which now have to be moved because of these beasts). Next year, I think I will move them to a raised row garden.

Reason for this is how you harvest the little lanterns. You don’t actually pick the ground cherries, you collect those that have fallen from the branches. They will be a pale yellow at this point and the husk will be papery. I have read that they can be stored for as long as three months in a cellar if they are kept in their husks. They can also be made into a variety of preserves, from jams and jellies to hot sauces and pie filling. I plan to do a fair share of ground cherry and gooseberry canning, after all, plants can produce up to 200 pounds of fruit each. And the great part, they keep on giving.

Ground cherries start fruiting by the end of July and continue until frost.

I have to admit, I was a little nervous adding a crop that I had never tasted nor heard of, but I am happy to report that ground cherries make a great addition to the homestead. So far I have only been able to harvest what you see in the top photo, but I suspect I will soon have enough to make my first preserves.

Ground cherries, from the tomatillo family, are a productive fruit for the backyard gardener, producing up to 200 pounds of fruit per plant. | www.pickytoplenty.com

Ground cherries, from the tomatillo family, are a productive fruit for the backyard gardener, producing up to 200 pounds of fruit per plant. | www.pickytoplenty.com

10 thoughts on “Why ground cherries are a great addition to the backyard garden

  1. These are so cool! I want to grow some now! Are they a perennial?

    Thanks for linking up with Green Thumb Thursday! I hope you’ll join us again this week!

    ~Lisa

    • They will reseed themselves apparently. Last year was my first year growing them. I had no idea what they were when I ordered a pack from a local seed retailer but I am so glad I took the chance. They produce a ton of tasty fruits that are great for raw eating, preserving, baking and dehydrating.

  2. Carol VanBruaene says:

    I have been looking for these for years! My grandmother grew them and made the BEST pies you ever had and I ate them faster then she could pick. So good! Please send me any info how to get some plants or seed,our farmers market said they never heard of them. My grandmother lived in Lacrosse Wisconsin.almost 60 years ago wow any way, I would appreciate any info Thank you. Carol

    • They are awesome and make an amazing pepper jelly. I’ve read they can get as tall as six feet but mine were about four feet tall. They produce a lot of fruit. Be careful not to plant them too close together as collecting the fruits will be more difficult. The ground cherries are ripe when they fall to the ground (hence the name ground cherry). Ground cherries are easy to grow and will seed themselves if you miss some of the fruit on the ground. Word to the wise, be sure to thin them out in the spring. I let mine go wild and I ended up with a small crop this year because the stems were too weak to hold all of the fruit. They are definite must have in my gardens. Thanks for stopping by.

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